BETHEL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



 - Dominic De Paolo's artfully painted oil piece of the exterior of the historic Bethel Presbyterian Church as it looked in its original white-clapboard appearance prior to 1964 when the church underwent a remodeling that included an added brick façade. De Paolo has been a freelance artist for more than 40 years, was an illustrator with the U.S. Navy, college professor, and currently owner of Long Grove Art School.  Bethel Presbyterian Church was established in 1834, and the Reverend Jesse Stalcup built the structure in 1885.  Today the church is Bethel Rural Community Organization's community center.
BETHEL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH



- Dominic De Paolo's artfully painted oil piece of the exterior of the historic Bethel Presbyterian Church as it looked in its original white-clapboard appearance prior to 1964 when the church underwent a remodeling that included an added brick façade. De Paolo has been a freelance artist for more than 40 years, was an illustrator with the U.S. Navy, college professor, and currently owner of Long Grove Art School. Bethel Presbyterian Church was established in 1834, and the Reverend Jesse Stalcup built the structure in 1885. Today the church is Bethel Rural Community Organization's community center.
BETHEL PRESBYTERIAN 
SANCTUARY


 - Gary Woolard was chosen in his native Beaufort County to paint the 12 oldest churches in the 12 oldest counties in the state. His rendering of the sanctuary of the 1885 Bethel Presbyterian Church with its striking chestnut bead board is a delicate balance between geometric precision and poetic artistry.
BETHEL PRESBYTERIAN
SANCTUARY


- Gary Woolard was chosen in his native Beaufort County to paint the 12 oldest churches in the 12 oldest counties in the state. His rendering of the sanctuary of the 1885 Bethel Presbyterian Church with its striking chestnut bead board is a delicate balance between geometric precision and poetic artistry.
BETHEL SCHOOL 
with STUDENTS - 1920s


 - Students of Bethel School from the 1920s are posed on the back side of the Bethel School building in a photograph donated to BRCO by Frank and Maxine Sorrells.  The photographer captured this portrait prior to the construction of the other two buildings that comprised the historic Bethel School campus.
BETHEL SCHOOL
with STUDENTS - 1920s


- Students of Bethel School from the 1920s are posed on the back side of the Bethel School building in a photograph donated to BRCO by Frank and Maxine Sorrells. The photographer captured this portrait prior to the construction of the other two buildings that comprised the historic Bethel School campus.
BETHEL SCHOOL



 - Dominick De Paolo painted a water-color of the three Bethel School buildings that comprised the heart of Bethel from 1921, 1930s, and 1941 until the 1970s when the structures were dismantled.  The three-story center building transferred Bethel students from attendance at Bethel Academy which closed after World War I.  Students attended classes on the bottom two floors of the center building while the Masonic/Eastern Star organization occupied the third floor.  By the 1930s a gymnasium surrounded by classroom followed, and the classically designed white auditorium/home economics/agricultural classrooms was constructed by the WPA in 1941.
BETHEL SCHOOL



- Dominick De Paolo painted a water-color of the three Bethel School buildings that comprised the heart of Bethel from 1921, 1930s, and 1941 until the 1970s when the structures were dismantled. The three-story center building transferred Bethel students from attendance at Bethel Academy which closed after World War I. Students attended classes on the bottom two floors of the center building while the Masonic/Eastern Star organization occupied the third floor. By the 1930s a gymnasium surrounded by classroom followed, and the classically designed white auditorium/home economics/agricultural classrooms was constructed by the WPA in 1941.
BURTON and LUCINDA MOORE CATHEY HOUSE



 - A photograph, owned by Bill and Earlene Holbrook, is of the Burton and Lucinda Moore Cathey House that was located in Cathey Cove until it was dismantled a few years ago. The original portion of the home was built by Dred Blaylock in 1849.
BURTON and LUCINDA MOORE CATHEY HOUSE



- A photograph, owned by Bill and Earlene Holbrook, is of the Burton and Lucinda Moore Cathey House that was located in Cathey Cove until it was dismantled a few years ago. The original portion of the home was built by Dred Blaylock in 1849.
CALVIN FILMORE CHRISTOPHER'S PATENT APPLICATION DRAWING



 - La Nae and Jack McCracken own the original 1912 application for patent drawings for the computing scale, precursor of today’s modern market scales and gasoline tank measuring devices, by Calvin Filmore Christopher. The inventor lived in Bethel and is NC’s most prolific inventor. Christopher’s scale invention is the forerunner of scales used all over the world.
CALVIN FILMORE CHRISTOPHER'S PATENT APPLICATION DRAWING



- La Nae and Jack McCracken own the original 1912 application for patent drawings for the computing scale, precursor of today’s modern market scales and gasoline tank measuring devices, by Calvin Filmore Christopher. The inventor lived in Bethel and is NC’s most prolific inventor. Christopher’s scale invention is the forerunner of scales used all over the world.
CAPTAIN JAMES ALLEN and NANCY LOUISA CATHEY BLAYLOCK HOUSE





 - Wanetta Welch created the Blaylock House painting in 1899, owned by Jack and Betty Lackey.  The Blaylock House began as an 1835 two-room cabin that continued to be encircled and expanded until 1890 when the house was essentially completed except for third floor tower improvements made in 1996 by owners Jerry and Nancy McFall.  The Reverend Jesse Stalcup built the house.  Blaylock was a Captain of the 25th NC Infantry Regiment.  Intrigue, including lost treasure and murder, followed members of the five generations of Blaylocks who lived in the house.
CAPTAIN JAMES ALLEN and NANCY LOUISA CATHEY BLAYLOCK HOUSE





- Wanetta Welch created the Blaylock House painting in 1899, owned by Jack and Betty Lackey. The Blaylock House began as an 1835 two-room cabin that continued to be encircled and expanded until 1890 when the house was essentially completed except for third floor tower improvements made in 1996 by owners Jerry and Nancy McFall. The Reverend Jesse Stalcup built the house. Blaylock was a Captain of the 25th NC Infantry Regiment. Intrigue, including lost treasure and murder, followed members of the five generations of Blaylocks who lived in the house.
COLONEL JOSEPH and NANCY HYATT CATHEY HOUSE


 - A late 1800s painting by Nettie Vance Penland is of the Colonel Joseph and Nancy Hyatt Cathey House, dated to the mid-1800s. The back of the painting indicates that the Cathey House was one of the first framed houses in Haywood County. Owners are Berry and Rosanna Rigdon.
COLONEL JOSEPH and NANCY HYATT CATHEY HOUSE


- A late 1800s painting by Nettie Vance Penland is of the Colonel Joseph and Nancy Hyatt Cathey House, dated to the mid-1800s. The back of the painting indicates that the Cathey House was one of the first framed houses in Haywood County. Owners are Berry and Rosanna Rigdon.
CATHEY MILL



 - A painting, dated to the late 1800s, by Nettie Vance Penland of the Cathey Mill is owned by Berry and Roseanna Rigdon. The mill began operation in the 1840s. In addition to his milling duties, Colonel Cathey was a state legislator, farmer, post master, and mercantile operator in the mid-1800s.
CATHEY MILL



- A painting, dated to the late 1800s, by Nettie Vance Penland of the Cathey Mill is owned by Berry and Roseanna Rigdon. The mill began operation in the 1840s. In addition to his milling duties, Colonel Cathey was a state legislator, farmer, post master, and mercantile operator in the mid-1800s.
INMAN CHAPEL



 - A 1965 painting of Inman Chapel by F. Seymore  was captured from a photograph given to the artist by the Reverend Hannah Jewett Powell.  The Reverend James Anderson Inman built the church which was dedicated in 1902.  During her tenure as pastor of the Universalist church (1921-1941) Powell became the first full-time female minister of a Universalist congregation in North Carolina; she initiated numerous social programs in Haywood County.
INMAN CHAPEL



- A 1965 painting of Inman Chapel by F. Seymore was captured from a photograph given to the artist by the Reverend Hannah Jewett Powell. The Reverend James Anderson Inman built the church which was dedicated in 1902. During her tenure as pastor of the Universalist church (1921-1941) Powell became the first full-time female minister of a Universalist congregation in North Carolina; she initiated numerous social programs in Haywood County.
J. B. RIGDON GENERAL STORE



 - The J. B. Rigdon General Store and mill house, originally built by the Plott family in the early 1900s, was a fixture in the heart of Bethel Community until the 1970s when it was dismantled. The painting was commissioned by Ozark folk artist, Granny Chicken, by Winifred R. McNeil and is currently owned by Richard and Evelyn Coltman.
J. B. RIGDON GENERAL STORE



- The J. B. Rigdon General Store and mill house, originally built by the Plott family in the early 1900s, was a fixture in the heart of Bethel Community until the 1970s when it was dismantled. The painting was commissioned by Ozark folk artist, Granny Chicken, by Winifred R. McNeil and is currently owned by Richard and Evelyn Coltman.
LENOIR'S CREEK FARM



 - Award winning artist, Janice Swanger, captured the essence of Lenoir’s Creek Devon, Haywood County’s longest continuing farm (1807) with the county’s longest continuing herd of cattle (mid-1800s when Red Devon cattle were brought to the farm by second owner, Thomas Isaac Lenoir). Her colored pencil painting brilliantly captures all of the historic structures remaining on the farm as well as the large variety of animals.
LENOIR'S CREEK FARM



- Award winning artist, Janice Swanger, captured the essence of Lenoir’s Creek Devon, Haywood County’s longest continuing farm (1807) with the county’s longest continuing herd of cattle (mid-1800s when Red Devon cattle were brought to the farm by second owner, Thomas Isaac Lenoir). Her colored pencil painting brilliantly captures all of the historic structures remaining on the farm as well as the large variety of animals.
OSBORNE BOUNDRY OAK



 - The painting of Osborne Boundary Oak, Osborne Farm, and the original log cabin beside the tree is loaned to the Historic Preservation Committee by Jackie Stephens, Curator of the Museum of North Carolina Handicrafts in Shelton House. The mid-20th century piece, painted by G.C. Monroe, depicts the tree that was used as a boundary marker in 1792. BRCO and citizens in the community have worked to save the historic tree.
OSBORNE BOUNDRY OAK



- The painting of Osborne Boundary Oak, Osborne Farm, and the original log cabin beside the tree is loaned to the Historic Preservation Committee by Jackie Stephens, Curator of the Museum of North Carolina Handicrafts in Shelton House. The mid-20th century piece, painted by G.C. Monroe, depicts the tree that was used as a boundary marker in 1792. BRCO and citizens in the community have worked to save the historic tree.
OSBORNE FARM




 - Donated by Robert Cathey and Bill Holbrook, this mid-19th century photograph of the Osborne Farm on Highway #110 reveals a portrait of one of Haywood County’s most prominent dairy farms.  Under the oversight of Arthur Osborne and his two sisters, Mary Louisa and Florence, the farm’s dairy and livestock interests were rated among the highest in the state.  In this photograph, the farm encompassed space on either side of the unpaved highway.  Today’s farm, known as the Triple R farm (named for Reeves, Rudy, and Richard Reeves) by their father, occupies only one side of the highway, and houses beef cattle.
OSBORNE FARM




- Donated by Robert Cathey and Bill Holbrook, this mid-19th century photograph of the Osborne Farm on Highway #110 reveals a portrait of one of Haywood County’s most prominent dairy farms. Under the oversight of Arthur Osborne and his two sisters, Mary Louisa and Florence, the farm’s dairy and livestock interests were rated among the highest in the state. In this photograph, the farm encompassed space on either side of the unpaved highway. Today’s farm, known as the Triple R farm (named for Reeves, Rudy, and Richard Reeves) by their father, occupies only one side of the highway, and houses beef cattle.
PINGREE PRIESTLY and 
CHARITY HASELTINE OSBORNE PLOTT HOUSE


 - Jimmie Ellen and Richard Henson own the 1980s drawing by Linda Anders Sizemore of the Victorian-style Pingree Priestly and Charity Haseltine Osborne Plott House.  The Reverend Jesse Stalcup built the house in 1867 off of Lake Logan Road on what grew to be a 1,311 acre estate.  Plott was a miller and farmer whose wife tended the children, some of whom suffered from tuberculosis.
PINGREE PRIESTLY and
CHARITY HASELTINE OSBORNE PLOTT HOUSE


- Jimmie Ellen and Richard Henson own the 1980s drawing by Linda Anders Sizemore of the Victorian-style Pingree Priestly and Charity Haseltine Osborne Plott House. The Reverend Jesse Stalcup built the house in 1867 off of Lake Logan Road on what grew to be a 1,311 acre estate. Plott was a miller and farmer whose wife tended the children, some of whom suffered from tuberculosis.
PINGREE PRIESTLY AND CHARITY HASELTINE OSBORNE 
PLOTT HOUSE (with people)


 - This house has occupied the location on a knoll off of Lake Logan road since 1867.  Built by the Reverend Jesse Stalcup, the house was one of four prominent houses constructed in Bethel by the Plott family.  This early 1900s portrait of the family in a front-yard setting was donated to BRCO by Bill and Carolyn Nettles, caretakers of the James Henry and Flora Kinsland Plott House where the painting was located.  James Henry was the son of Pingree and Charity Plott.
PINGREE PRIESTLY AND CHARITY HASELTINE OSBORNE
PLOTT HOUSE (with people)


- This house has occupied the location on a knoll off of Lake Logan road since 1867. Built by the Reverend Jesse Stalcup, the house was one of four prominent houses constructed in Bethel by the Plott family. This early 1900s portrait of the family in a front-yard setting was donated to BRCO by Bill and Carolyn Nettles, caretakers of the James Henry and Flora Kinsland Plott House where the painting was located. James Henry was the son of Pingree and Charity Plott.
SUNBURST LOGGING and TRAIL SITE MAP



 - Mack Ledbetter’s colored map of Sunburst logging village, one of the largest logging operations in Western North Carolina in the early 20th Century, details the twenty-four logging camps, rail lines, and various buildings and locations that existed from the early 1900s until 1925. A devastating fire burned the village in 1925, and the area was subsequently inundated to become Lake Logan by Champion Paper and Fiber Company in 1932.  Lorna Ledbetter Ashe and the Mack Ledbetter family own the map.
SUNBURST LOGGING and TRAIL SITE MAP



- Mack Ledbetter’s colored map of Sunburst logging village, one of the largest logging operations in Western North Carolina in the early 20th Century, details the twenty-four logging camps, rail lines, and various buildings and locations that existed from the early 1900s until 1925. A devastating fire burned the village in 1925, and the area was subsequently inundated to become Lake Logan by Champion Paper and Fiber Company in 1932. Lorna Ledbetter Ashe and the Mack Ledbetter family own the map.
TRUSS BRIDGE #79




 - BRCO’s Historic Preservation Committee commissioned artist Gary Woolard to produce an acrylic painting of North Carolina’s oldest metal truss bridge which is located in Bethel on Lake Logan Road.  Constructed in 1891 by Dean & Westbrook engineers, the bridge was formerly situated at another location in Bethel until the 1920s when it was moved by men in the community to its current location.  This bridge is Haywood County and North Carolina’s only 19th century truss bridge and is the only ornamental truss bridge in NC to contain decorative elements.  Its joint system is unlike any other in the state, and its Phoenix columns and cast iron joining system make the bridge rare at the national level. BRCO’s Carroll Jones has submitted the bridge’s nomination to the National Register of Historic Places.
TRUSS BRIDGE #79




- BRCO’s Historic Preservation Committee commissioned artist Gary Woolard to produce an acrylic painting of North Carolina’s oldest metal truss bridge which is located in Bethel on Lake Logan Road. Constructed in 1891 by Dean & Westbrook engineers, the bridge was formerly situated at another location in Bethel until the 1920s when it was moved by men in the community to its current location. This bridge is Haywood County and North Carolina’s only 19th century truss bridge and is the only ornamental truss bridge in NC to contain decorative elements. Its joint system is unlike any other in the state, and its Phoenix columns and cast iron joining system make the bridge rare at the national level. BRCO’s Carroll Jones has submitted the bridge’s nomination to the National Register of Historic Places.
WOODROW DEPOT/POST OFFICE



- Artist DominicNick De Paolo had only a historic photo of one end of the Woodrow Train Station from which to create an artistic rendering of the 1914-1927 structure that served as a depot for the T & NC Railroad in Bethel.  Named for the President at the time, Woodrow Wilson, the structure simultaneously served as a post office, a designation that placed Woodrow on maps to this day. Passengers traveled from Canton to Sunburst and Spruce and all places in between on a small jitney bus that utilized rail tracks.  Rail cars transported pulp wood and sawn lumber from Sunburst logging operation to the Canton paper mill.  The nearby kaolin mine used a tram operation to transport clay to railcars for shipment to Canton and beyond while returning to the mine with coal used to fuel steam-generating boilers.  Local apple farmers took advantage of the Woodrow railcars in the fall to transport produce.  Today, Highway #215 shadows the space once occupied by the T & NC railroad tracks.
WOODROW DEPOT/POST OFFICE



- Artist DominicNick De Paolo had only a historic photo of one end of the Woodrow Train Station from which to create an artistic rendering of the 1914-1927 structure that served as a depot for the T & NC Railroad in Bethel. Named for the President at the time, Woodrow Wilson, the structure simultaneously served as a post office, a designation that placed Woodrow on maps to this day. Passengers traveled from Canton to Sunburst and Spruce and all places in between on a small jitney bus that utilized rail tracks. Rail cars transported pulp wood and sawn lumber from Sunburst logging operation to the Canton paper mill. The nearby kaolin mine used a tram operation to transport clay to railcars for shipment to Canton and beyond while returning to the mine with coal used to fuel steam-generating boilers. Local apple farmers took advantage of the Woodrow railcars in the fall to transport produce. Today, Highway #215 shadows the space once occupied by the T & NC railroad tracks.
WOODROW DEPOT/POST OFFICE PHOTOGRAPH



Bill Holbrook donated the black and white photograph from the Charles Cathey collection of one of the only known extant pictures of the early 1900s Woodrow Depot/Post Office.  The photo reveals only one end of the building, but it clearly shows railcars and people of the era who were there to collect their mail or else board the jitney that transported travelers from Canton to Sunburst and Spruce.  The building is named for President Woodrow Wilson who was President during the 1914-1927 era the structure existed.  The “Woodrow” name still exists on maps today.
WOODROW DEPOT/POST OFFICE PHOTOGRAPH



Bill Holbrook donated the black and white photograph from the Charles Cathey collection of one of the only known extant pictures of the early 1900s Woodrow Depot/Post Office. The photo reveals only one end of the building, but it clearly shows railcars and people of the era who were there to collect their mail or else board the jitney that transported travelers from Canton to Sunburst and Spruce. The building is named for President Woodrow Wilson who was President during the 1914-1927 era the structure existed. The “Woodrow” name still exists on maps today.

PASSENGER PIGEONS



- Artist Stephanie Grimes traveled to the Cincinnati Zoo to photograph a male and female stuffed passenger pigeon bearing the likeness of the birds that are considered by some to have been the most prolific birds ever to have inhabited the planet.  Before their extinction in 1914, the passenger pigeon roosted in oak and chestnut trees during their migratory passage through Bethel.  Their stop-over journey served to forest the area with oak and chestnut trees, fertilize the soil, and create a legacy with the names Pigeon River, Pigeon Valley, Pigeon Gap, and Pigeon Street.  Grimes utilizes a unique artistic technique known as “scratchboard” in which etching tools are used delicately to score the likeness on a dark kaolin surface.  Some have compared the resulting intense, detailed, and striking likeness, meticulously fashioned,  to the appearance of a finely embroidered design using delicate silk threads.
PASSENGER PIGEONS



- Artist Stephanie Grimes traveled to the Cincinnati Zoo to photograph a male and female stuffed passenger pigeon bearing the likeness of the birds that are considered by some to have been the most prolific birds ever to have inhabited the planet. Before their extinction in 1914, the passenger pigeon roosted in oak and chestnut trees during their migratory passage through Bethel. Their stop-over journey served to forest the area with oak and chestnut trees, fertilize the soil, and create a legacy with the names Pigeon River, Pigeon Valley, Pigeon Gap, and Pigeon Street. Grimes utilizes a unique artistic technique known as “scratchboard” in which etching tools are used delicately to score the likeness on a dark kaolin surface. Some have compared the resulting intense, detailed, and striking likeness, meticulously fashioned, to the appearance of a finely embroidered design using delicate silk threads.
PINGREE PRIESTLY & CHARITY HASELTINE OSBORNE PLOTT HOUSE 


Pingree Plott inherited land from his father, Jonathan Plott, that eventually included 1,311 acres.  He married Charity Haseltine Osborne in 1866.  In 1867, the couple selected a scenic knoll situated on the farm that looked toward his mill.  They hired builder, the Reverend Jesse Stalcup, to construct the nine room Victorian home to accommodate their five sons and one daughter.  Blue windows and a bedroom porch served the needs of their consumptive daughter, Annie Haseltine. Descendants of the Plott family continue to live in the house. 

Jason Hawkins is a Bethel native and a 1995 cum laude graduate (Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Art and Historic Preservation) of the Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia.  Hawkins is a resident of New Orleans, Louisiana, but is still passionate about painting historic Haywood County homes.
PINGREE PRIESTLY & CHARITY HASELTINE OSBORNE PLOTT HOUSE


Pingree Plott inherited land from his father, Jonathan Plott, that eventually included 1,311 acres. He married Charity Haseltine Osborne in 1866. In 1867, the couple selected a scenic knoll situated on the farm that looked toward his mill. They hired builder, the Reverend Jesse Stalcup, to construct the nine room Victorian home to accommodate their five sons and one daughter. Blue windows and a bedroom porch served the needs of their consumptive daughter, Annie Haseltine. Descendants of the Plott family continue to live in the house.

Jason Hawkins is a Bethel native and a 1995 cum laude graduate (Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Art and Historic Preservation) of the Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia. Hawkins is a resident of New Orleans, Louisiana, but is still passionate about painting historic Haywood County homes.
JAMES HENRY & FLORA PLOTT HOUSE 



James Henry Plott was the fourth child of Pingree Priestly and Charity Haseltine Osborne Plott.  His 1900 marriage to Flora Kinsland, the daughter of state legislator, Marion DeKalb Kinsland, united two prominent family lines in Haywood County.  On land inherited from James Henry’s mother, Charity, in what was called “Garden Farm” or “Flowery Garden,” the couple hired builder, George Smathers, to construct a Colonial Revival/Queen Anne style house in 1904.  They reared six children there.  The house stood on an original 260 acres that included the Garden Creek Native American settlement that dates to 8,000 B.C. as well as on the site of the first white settlement in Haywood County in 1785.  Bethel Rural Community Organization assisted the family with disbursement of Plott artifacts and memorabilia that were gifted to six museums when the house was sold in 2018.  

Art Print by artist Jason Hawkins:
Jason Hawkins is a Bethel native and a 1995 cum laude graduate (Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Art and Historic Preservation) of the Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia.  Hawkins is a resident of New Orleans, Louisiana, but is still passionate about painting historic Haywood County homes.
JAMES HENRY & FLORA PLOTT HOUSE



James Henry Plott was the fourth child of Pingree Priestly and Charity Haseltine Osborne Plott. His 1900 marriage to Flora Kinsland, the daughter of state legislator, Marion DeKalb Kinsland, united two prominent family lines in Haywood County. On land inherited from James Henry’s mother, Charity, in what was called “Garden Farm” or “Flowery Garden,” the couple hired builder, George Smathers, to construct a Colonial Revival/Queen Anne style house in 1904. They reared six children there. The house stood on an original 260 acres that included the Garden Creek Native American settlement that dates to 8,000 B.C. as well as on the site of the first white settlement in Haywood County in 1785. Bethel Rural Community Organization assisted the family with disbursement of Plott artifacts and memorabilia that were gifted to six museums when the house was sold in 2018.

Art Print by artist Jason Hawkins:
Jason Hawkins is a Bethel native and a 1995 cum laude graduate (Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Art and Historic Preservation) of the Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia. Hawkins is a resident of New Orleans, Louisiana, but is still passionate about painting historic Haywood County homes.
JOSEPH TURNER & MARTHA ANNA IVA KILLIAN CATHEY  HOUSE 


One of the earliest families to settle in Haywood County, NC, arrived in Pigeon Valley (Bethel) in 1798.  Joseph Turner Cathey was the fourth child of Colonel Joseph Cathey, state Senator, and Nancy Hyatt Cathey.  His marriage to Martha Anna Iva Killian in 1858 resulted in building what is considered to be one of the oldest remaining historic houses in Bethel and Haywood County; the family moved in by 1860.  Builders were Dred and Willis Blaylock.  Joseph Turner enrolled in the 25th NC Regiment, Company F, during the Civil War and died at Wilson, NC in 1863 at age 28.  Martha Anna Iva remained to complete the house by 1864 and resided there with her three children. Six generations of the Cathey family have resided in the Greek Revival-style house, along with two ghosts. 

Art Print by artist Jason Hawkins:
Jason Hawkins is a Bethel native and a 1995 cum laude graduate (Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Art and Historic Preservation) of the Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia.  Hawkins is a resident of New Orleans, Louisiana, but is still passionate about painting historic Haywood County homes.
JOSEPH TURNER & MARTHA ANNA IVA KILLIAN CATHEY HOUSE


One of the earliest families to settle in Haywood County, NC, arrived in Pigeon Valley (Bethel) in 1798. Joseph Turner Cathey was the fourth child of Colonel Joseph Cathey, state Senator, and Nancy Hyatt Cathey. His marriage to Martha Anna Iva Killian in 1858 resulted in building what is considered to be one of the oldest remaining historic houses in Bethel and Haywood County; the family moved in by 1860. Builders were Dred and Willis Blaylock. Joseph Turner enrolled in the 25th NC Regiment, Company F, during the Civil War and died at Wilson, NC in 1863 at age 28. Martha Anna Iva remained to complete the house by 1864 and resided there with her three children. Six generations of the Cathey family have resided in the Greek Revival-style house, along with two ghosts.

Art Print by artist Jason Hawkins:
Jason Hawkins is a Bethel native and a 1995 cum laude graduate (Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Art and Historic Preservation) of the Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia. Hawkins is a resident of New Orleans, Louisiana, but is still passionate about painting historic Haywood County homes.
COLONEL JOSEPH CATHEY




Colonel Joseph Cathey (1807 – 1879) was a church and civic leader, mercantile proprietor, postmaster, miller, farmer, and state legislator. Descended from William and Catherine Turner Cathey, among the first settlers in Bethel Community and Haywood County, Colonel Cathey and Nancy Hyatt Cathey had nine children.  Colonel Cathey established residence at Forks of Pigeon in Bethel Community where he operated a store, post office, and a mill.  His journeys to trade goods in southern regions enabled him to bring unique products to his local community.  Cathey voiced a strong advocacy for improved schools and was named by the North Carolina General Assembly as Chairman of Common Schools in the western section of the state.  He served one term as a state senator.  An obituary to Cathey in W.C. Allen’s Annals of Haywood County, praised him: “He was an excellent farmer, merchant, miller, trader, a good family physician, and a most excellent legislator. He was well versed in the general principles of law, theology, medicine, physics, and almost every department of knowledge.” Portrait is a black and white pencil drawing by Anne Carr.
COLONEL JOSEPH CATHEY




Colonel Joseph Cathey (1807 – 1879) was a church and civic leader, mercantile proprietor, postmaster, miller, farmer, and state legislator. Descended from William and Catherine Turner Cathey, among the first settlers in Bethel Community and Haywood County, Colonel Cathey and Nancy Hyatt Cathey had nine children. Colonel Cathey established residence at Forks of Pigeon in Bethel Community where he operated a store, post office, and a mill. His journeys to trade goods in southern regions enabled him to bring unique products to his local community. Cathey voiced a strong advocacy for improved schools and was named by the North Carolina General Assembly as Chairman of Common Schools in the western section of the state. He served one term as a state senator. An obituary to Cathey in W.C. Allen’s Annals of Haywood County, praised him: “He was an excellent farmer, merchant, miller, trader, a good family physician, and a most excellent legislator. He was well versed in the general principles of law, theology, medicine, physics, and almost every department of knowledge.” Portrait is a black and white pencil drawing by Anne Carr.

Winners of the 2012 art competition conducted by Bethel Rural Community Organization (BRCO) are on display permanently in the dining hall of Bethel Presbyterian Church which serves as BRCO's community center. The purpose of the art contest was to document historic sites in the Bethel community, encourage an appreciation of the history of the area, provide decorative enhancement to the dining hall of Bethel Presbyterian Church, partner with talented artists in Haywood County, and make the art pieces available for purchase to the general public.  


Beginning in 2013 and every year since, BRCO has enhanced its art collection by accumulating prints of historic sites produced from original paintings, photographs, and drawings. Some of the original pieces date as far back as the late 1800s.  To date, sixteen prints are collected and displayed in BRCO's dining hall.  


ClickBRCO has commissioned photographer Carol Litchfield to make high-resolution photographs of all original art pieces which are subsequently  reprinted on quality matte paper.  Orders will be shipped upon receipt of payment and as production schedule permits (due to allowance for art print production schedules, the order may take up to two weeks to process). The price for each art print is $50.00 which includes a $5.00 fee for shipping/handling/delivery .  

Art Prints of Historic Sites for Sale

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